Road safety warning as rail contract expires

FAREWELL: The last train heads out of Rudall with the Eyre Peninsula Railway officially closing this week.

FAREWELL: The last train heads out of Rudall with the Eyre Peninsula Railway officially closing this week.

The sight of a train passing through the Eastern Eyre Peninsula is now officially a thing of the past, with the final train loaded and sent on its way from the Rudall silos on Tuesday afternoon.

Police are reminding the community to look out for trucks with increased heavy vehicle traffic expected on the highways of the lower Eyre Peninsula.

Eyre Western Local Service Area's Superintendent Paul Bahr said police are urging drivers to respect these vehicles to maintain road safety.

"In particular, drivers in the region are urged to drive with caution and patience," he said.

Police are reminding drivers to only overtake when it is safe to do so, staying aware of blind spots and mindful of the windrush and suction effects of the turbulent air created by the heavy vehicle when overtaking.

Superintendent Bahr said police had launched "Operation Eyre Safe" to educate the community and enforce the road rules.

"The motoring public - including local drivers, visitors to the region and heavy vehicle drivers - can expect to see greater police attention to the Lower Eyre Peninsula highways," he said.

The rail contract officially expired on Friday, May 31, with final trains passing through the lower Eyre Peninsula on Thursday.

Festivities were held in Cummins to commemorate the impact the Eyre Peninsula Railway has had on the community over the years.

Earlier in the week, a group of about twelve gathered in Rudall to watch the final train pass through the area.

The group was mainly comprised of retired local farmers and train enthusiasts from as far as Sydney.

Onlooker Colin Workman said he had started his career as a junior at the Rudall 'station' and he was not going to miss it.