Letters to the editor

Let’s get started

At long last we have a politician who is attempting to start a conversation about nuclear energy in Australia, Cory Bernardi.

At last someone is prepared to put their foot over the border into the long term future of Australia. 

This conversation is well and truly overdue and one can only hope that it is carried out with bi-partisan intelligence and common sense (if such is available on the present political landscape). 

For a fraction of the cost of renewables this state could be considering nuclear and a whole range of new industries associated with it and possible only because of it.

Industries (including the desalinisation of water at a consumable cost) that are out of the question at this time and under present conditions, could secure many regions well into the future. 

The creation of one industry leads to the creation of support industries, it makes sense. 

So please allow this conversation to advance sensibly, without emotional scaremongering or political and ill-conceived grandstanding.

DENNIS PARKER

Yongala

Relief for all

Finally, after many long, financially and socially ruining droughts throughout Australia's history, there is hope for all regional areas that are affected.

Prime Minister Morrison's statement last Friday -  "We know the drought is not just felt on the farm. When spending dries up in regional towns, it threatens the prosperity of local businesses and the families who run them" is confirmation that we have a government which listens, not just hears, and then acts decisively.

Droughts and their impact have always been felt well beyond the farm gate, and to see this finally acknowledged and catered for is a refreshing and much needed change.

Well done Prime Minister Morrison and cabinet.

IAN MACGOWAN

10 Nicholas Street

Ceduna

Hold govt to account

Within the Senate building in Canberra I've seen the antics of personality parties using desperate tactics to get publicity. 

Whether it's sugary-sweet (but unfunded) promises or social experiments, ambulance-chasing or outrageous statements, Australians might forget what the Senate is for. 

The Senate is the States' house and the vital means to hold government to account, scrutinising the government's legislation, budget and spending. 

Parties in a house of review must do so through the prism of policy and principle, not the peccadilloes or price of an individual. 

Governments are formed in the lower house (the green ballot paper), voters on the white Senate ballot paper need to send principled party candidates to Canberra who will get the Senate to do its job.

RIKKI LAMBERT

Angaston, Senate candidate for the Australian Conservative Party 

Letters to the editor

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