Silo art lights up

ILLUMINATED: Kimba's silo art is South Australia's first permanently lit silo art after being lit up on Friday evening. Picture: Dylan Harradine.
ILLUMINATED: Kimba's silo art is South Australia's first permanently lit silo art after being lit up on Friday evening. Picture: Dylan Harradine.

Kimba residents and visitors will be able to see the town’s silo art in all its glory at night with the installation of solar lights, which were officially switched on on Friday night.

Travellers and community members gathered to witness the spectacle of Kimba’s young girl in the wheat field being lit up with lighting powered by the sun and they were not disappointed when the lights were switched on right on cue.

It really lit up our town, not just the silo art, and will encourage people to stay overnight.

Brenton O'Donohue

Kimba local Brenton O’Donohue, who had gathered a band of visiting grey nomads to join him for the event said the “light up” was fantastic.

“It really lit up our town, not just the silo art, and will encourage people to stay overnight,” Mr O’Donohue said.

“The visitors were overwhelmed with the floodlit silo art, their welcome by other locals to join in, and the whole town in general.”  

Kimba Community Development Group chairwoman Heather Baldock thanked the community for their generousity, which allowed the $30,000 stage two to be completed debt free as well as the sufficient funds to cover infrastructure insurance into the next decade and basic maintenance.

“Stage three will roll out shortly with more seating and improved signage at the viewing area and new signage at town entrances,” Mrs Baldock said. 

“The various stages of the silo art project are about building on the value of the masterpiece as great public art and bringing economic benefits to the community.”

Kimba’s silo art, which was painted by Cam Scale and officially opened last September, is the first to be permanently lit up in South Australia and the second in Australia.

Powered by solar, the lights will come on at 6.30pm each evening in the winter months and the amount time they stay on will be determined by the sunlight received through the day.