Pte Noble’s war stories recorded

During his service in World War II, Private Richard Noble of Kielpa went against his orders and kept a diary of what he experienced in the second Australian Imperial Forces and these stories have now been passed onto his family.

ANZAC: Elizabeth Lois Noble holding a picture of her husband, Private Richard Noble, with son, Ivan.

ANZAC: Elizabeth Lois Noble holding a picture of her husband, Private Richard Noble, with son, Ivan.

Mr Noble was in his late 20s when he left Woodside outside Adelaide for war in 1941, as one of the oldest in his battalion.

His wife, Elizabeth Lois, said he did not talk about his war experiences when he returned.

“He didn’t talk much about it but he wrote his diaries even though he wasn’t supposed to,” Mrs Noble said.

“He got lost in Papua New Guinea for seven days on his own before he found what he called, the Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels, a tribe who took him back to his camp.

“He also got injured by shrapnel in his head.”

Mr Noble fought with men who had been living and working in the area prior to enlisting, but not with anyone from local families.

Upon his return, Mr Noble returned to farming in Kielpa, and joined the Darke Peak sub-branch of the Returned and Services League (RSL).

“He wouldn’t march on Anzac Day originally, but some of the returned men coached him into it,” Mrs Noble said.

“Once he started, he did it every year at Cleve and Cowell, and once we went to Adelaide.

“He was proud of his service in the war.”

Mr Noble passed away in September 2003 but his legacy lives on through his diary entries, which were typed up by his daughter-in-law and shared throughout his family.

Eastern Eyre Anzac Services

Cleve: Service at 6.30am

Arno Bay: Service at 11am

Kimba: Parade at 10am

Cowell: Service at 6.45am; March at 11am