New insights for Kimba delegation

DELEGATION: Maree Barford, Nicole McGuire, Kristi Francis, Martin Francis, Marina Clifford, Aileen Pearce, Francene Francis, Kevin Pearce, Peta Willmott, Brett Francis, Patricia Beinke, Austen Eatts, Kerri Rayson and Hef Griffiths
DELEGATION: Maree Barford, Nicole McGuire, Kristi Francis, Martin Francis, Marina Clifford, Aileen Pearce, Francene Francis, Kevin Pearce, Peta Willmott, Brett Francis, Patricia Beinke, Austen Eatts, Kerri Rayson and Hef Griffiths

Eleven Kimba residents visited Lucas Heights on Monday, to see Australia’s nuclear technology and radioactive waste management expertise.

The delegation included four neighbours of the two Kimba sites volunteered for a national nuclear waste facility, three members of the Kimba Consultative Committee (KCC), and other community members.

Consultative committee member Patricia Beinke saw the OPAL multi-purpose reactor, where Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) stores low and intermediate level radioactive waste, and how waste is prepared for transport.

“It was a much bigger campus and complex than I had ever envisaged.

“I read all the information that comes my way, but wasn’t expecting this scale.”

Austen Eatts has property that neighbours one of the volunteered sites and is opposed to the facility but was pleased to see the campus.

“I have always had a reasonable idea of what happens at ANSTO regarding medicine and industry and what they are doing there is very good actually,” Mr Eatts said.

“The waste has to be put somewhere, I am still of two minds about whether it should be located in Kimba but I found the trip very informative.”

Mr Eatts said he was against the idea of a facility anywhere in Australia that could store high level, imported waste from overseas.

National Radioactive Waste Management Taskforce general manager Bruce McCleary said the national facility will not hold international or high level waste.