Arno Bay boardwalk working bee to replace posts

WORKING BEE: At the first Arno Bay Boardwalk working bee were: back: Michael Smith, Terry Haines, Ben Haines, Tony Zwar, Warren Elson, Bruce Buckingham; front: Yvonne Britza, Greg Elson, Wilma Harding and Elly Schultz (NRM officer).
WORKING BEE: At the first Arno Bay Boardwalk working bee were: back: Michael Smith, Terry Haines, Ben Haines, Tony Zwar, Warren Elson, Bruce Buckingham; front: Yvonne Britza, Greg Elson, Wilma Harding and Elly Schultz (NRM officer).

The Arno Bay Boardwalk working group had its first working bee on Sunday, February 4.

The working bees are being held to replace the older style wooden posts with composite material posts made of wood and plastic, which are extremely heavy to lift but are more resilient to the elements of weather and salt water. 

Five members successfully dug in 14 large posts for the day.

A barbecue lunch was enjoyed by members with their families joining in, followed by a meeting and a guest speaker.

Elly Schultz is the new Natural Resources Management officer and joined the group as guest speaker.

She was invaluable with knowledge on samphire plants within the estuary area and helpful with replacing the signage, as some signs were becoming faded and hard to read.

She also gave the group some ideas for further funding, which is always needed for maintenance and replacement of the infrastructure.

The group thanked Ms Schultz for her time and the information that she shared.

The group has had great support in the district with donations from the Cleve District Council and Quinn Transport.

Workers come from Cleve, Arno Bay and surrounds and put in many hours of work to make this area accessible to everyone.

There are also tours for schools and visitor groups to study the ecology of the area.

Anyone who would like to be part of the working group can call call Yvonne on 0428 998 357.

The group usually works on the weekend and invites anyone to join in to help. All tools and lunch are supplied to those who participate in the working bees.