A man with land in his bones

FAMILY MAN: Bob Beinke was a man with the land in his bones and a deep love for his family, faith and music.

FAMILY MAN: Bob Beinke was a man with the land in his bones and a deep love for his family, faith and music.

Arthur Robertson (Bob) Beinke

27/6/1923 – 3/8/2017

ARTHUR Robertson Beinke (Bob) was born in Cowell, the second child of Alec and Katie Beinke.

He grew up on the farm at Ben Lomond, Yabmana with his siblings Jean, Gerald, Nancy, Quentin, Mick, Pauline, Maurice, Dennis and Terry.

After leaving school at age 13, he put in his first crop on his own.

In 2016 he planted his 79th crop at the ripe of age of 93 and although he was keen, he was unable to get into the tractor in 2017 to sow his 80th crop.

In his younger years, Mr Beinke also became a shearer, working at a number of sheds throughout the district.

He soon saved enough to buy his first motorbike, a BSA 250cc.

Soon, he met a sweet young lady, named Catherine, at a dance at Elbow Hill.

They were married on February 2, 1949 at Bookabie, settling into farm life at Elbow Hill, before moving to Mattam and then onto Narridy Creek.

Bob and Catherine had nine children, Margaret, Bernie, Yvonne, Francie, Ellen, Leo, Raymund, John and Robert.

Mr Beinke worked extremely hard on Narridy Creek, picking hundreds of tonnes of stones, replacing miles and miles of fencing, cropping (in among the hills and creeks) and running sheep.

His son, Francie, worked alongside him from the age of 15, for the next 47 years and the partnership was broken only recently with Francie’s passing.

As the years went on, Mr Beinke’s children all married and started families of their own.

At last count, he had 28 grandchildren and 31 great grandchildren, with three on the way.

In 2000, he travelled with his son Raymund to the Anzac service at Gallipoli.

He was a staunch patriot with immense love and respect for returned service personnel and, in particular the fallen.

He was deeply honoured to be invited to join the RSL as a representative of his late father.

He was also a voracious reader and had enormous knowledge about the Anzacs and Australia’s involvement in both World Wars.

Bob Beinke's knowledge of the history of the Franklin Harbour District as well as his keen memory for detail is also legendary – able to recount, in vivid detail, many events of the past right until the very end.

Mr Beinke’s knowledge of the history of the Franklin Harbour District as well as his keen memory for detail is also legendary – able to recount, in vivid detail, many events of the past right until the very end.

He was a great historian, with an avid interest in the National Trust.

The Beinkes continued to live on the farm for many years after the family had grown up and moved away.

Sadly, his wife Cath passed away in 2010.

Mr Beinke continued to live at Narridy Creek until November 2016 when he moved into care at the Cowell Hospital, often being whisked away by family members on excursions to visit his beloved farm.

His last few days were spent with his family, crop inspecting, sitting in the shearing shed, watching the men work and attending Smith’s ram sale, time perfect for a man with the land in his bones and a deep love for his family, his faith and his music.