Michelle Obama: Women who supported Trump 'voted against their own voice'

During one of her rare appearances since leaving the White House, the former first lady sat down with author and feminist Roxane Gay to impart her wisdom on politics, remaining vocal and womanhood at the Inbound marketing conference session held in Boston.

Obama broached many important subjects, including changing the language and conversation around the 'first lady' position, and the implications women face after a vast number voted against Hillary Clinton.

The 53-year-old revealed she remains optimistic that one day a woman will be elected into the oval office, but warned women must not be complacent and silent. While more women, 54 per cent specifically, according to CNN's exit polls, voted for Clinton, there was a shift among white women, 52 per cent of which voted for Trump.

"First spouse (rather than first lady)- I'll keep saying that because someday it will happen," she said according to CNN during her candid Q&A with Gay.

"Any woman who voted against Hillary Clinton voted against their own voice."

"What does it mean for us as women that we look at these two candidates as women, and many of us said, "That guy, he's better for me, his voice is more true to me.' Well, to me that just says you don't like your voice, you like the things you're told to like."

In true Obama style, the former first lady turned the negative to positive, saying it is important for women to value the power of their own voice and self, even if their words are not perfect, rather than remaining silent in the Trump era.

"Life teaches you great," she said to the crowd of thousands while discussing her view that obstacles are lessons . "It gives you the ability to encounter obstacles. That's why I always tell young people don't be afraid of failure, don't be afraid of those obstacles. Those are the things that make you stronger. They make you better"

Obama attributed authenicity and remaining true to herself as the reasoning behind her success.

While her conversation for the most part remained focused on politics, the former first lady also spoke honestly about having more freedom in the post-politcs era.

"It was like being shot out of a cannon ??? with a blindfold and the spotlight on you," she said about being first lady. She also took the time out to answer a very important question on her favourite song from Beyonce's Lemonade album (it's Love Drought).

Despite her digs at the new administration, she had some final advice on how to leave a empowering legacy during and after time in office, saying it comes down to being "humble and diplomatic."

Gay later tweeted that speaking with Obama was "one of the greatest honors of my life" adding that her comments on women who voted for Trump were "insightful."

Obama's appearance comes after former president Barack Obama shared a sweet anecdote about dropping his older daughter, Malia, off at Harvard last month at an event for the Beau Biden Foundation for the Protection of Children.

"For those of us who have daughters, it just happens fast," Obama said while standing with former vice-president Joe Biden at the event. "I dropped off Malia at college, and I was saying to Joe and Jill that it was a little bit like open-heart surgery I was proud that I did not cry in front of her but on the way back, the secret service was looking straight ahead pretending they weren't hearing me as I sniffled and blew my nose. It was rough."

This story Michelle Obama: Women who supported Trump 'voted against their own voice' first appeared on The Sydney Morning Herald.