Push to drop highway speed limit at Arno Bay

Danger around the corner: Councillor Dean Sivour wants the speed reduced at the Cleve Arno Bay Road/Lincoln Highway intersection.
Danger around the corner: Councillor Dean Sivour wants the speed reduced at the Cleve Arno Bay Road/Lincoln Highway intersection.

The campaign to change the speed limit on Lincoln Highway at the intersection of Cleve Arno Bay Road has gained support from a fuel company looking to open a 24 hour service station in Arno Bay, bringing fuel back to the township.

Direct Fuels is working on a project to re-open the roadhouse on the Lincoln Highway at Arno Bay to service the local community and people travelling through on the highway.

However traffic management is a stumbling block for the development and the company is pushing to have the speed reduced to 80 kilometres an hour to avoid having to put in slip lanes.

Direct Fuels managing director Craig Male has been pushing for the change for 12 months and believes the speed reduction should happen regardless of the roadhouse.

“It’s a safety issue, if you have a truck coming out onto the highway and someone is coming around the bend at 110km/h, by the time they see the truck, it could be too late for the driver.”

There have been a number of attempts to have the speed limit reduced in past years, with the Cleve District Council contacting the Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure on numerous occasions to request a reduction.

David Frick from the Arno Bay Progress Association has also tried unsuccessfully to have the limit reduced.

“It's a safety concern, you have various turn offs along the highway and when you turn onto the highway in a car, if it isn’t completely clear, before you can reach 110km/h, you can have another car right behind you.”

Cleve councillor Dean Sivour said the intersection was far too dangerous at 110km/h. “It is only a matter of time until there is a major accident along this stretch of road, especially with the number of grain trucks travelling between silos and Port Lincoln,” Mr Sivour said.

The Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure was unable to provide comment before deadline.