Funds to teach safer driving

FUNDS: Cleve Area School principal Ray Marino, students Nathan Byrnes and Alesha Hannemann and teacher Trevor McDonough with the $5000 cheque from RAA.

FUNDS: Cleve Area School principal Ray Marino, students Nathan Byrnes and Alesha Hannemann and teacher Trevor McDonough with the $5000 cheque from RAA.

CLEVE Area School has received a $5000 grant from the RAA to run its Country Safe driver education course for 40 L-plate drivers. 

The grant pool of $50,940 was distributed between 16 projects to improve the safety of rural South Australians.

The Cleve Area School, Port Neill Progress Association and Tumby Bay Netball Club all received funding for projects aimed at improving safety in their communities. 

Cleve Area School principal Ray Marino said the course was something the school usually ran each year to ensure its young drivers knew how to drive safely but due to lack of funding was unable to run the course last year. 

“It is something we run every year out at the field days site and we have a group of our young drivers take part to learn tactical and defensive driving skills,” Mr Marino said.

Cleve Area School teacher Trevor McDonough said funding from the RAA would go towards holding the course for year 11s but also the year 12 class who missed out on the course last year. 

He said the driving program taught practical skills like how to threshold break, in the students own car. 

“That way they learn how to control the car they will be driving and how it will react,” he said.

RAA Insurance received a record amount of grant applications this year which strategic communications senior manager, Amanda Trainor said it was not surprising given that rural communities struggled to raise money or access funding.

“The school wasn’t able to run the course in 2016 after a funding cut, so it is fantastic they can now help their students to be safer drivers,” Ms Trainor said. 

The Port Neill Progress Association received a grant of $1000 to upgrade its community van to include baby seats and and a UHF radio to improve communications.

The community van is used by older citizens, a local playground and school children.