Long-time Ceduna volunteer Kath Dunn cannot envision stopping soon

PASSIONATE VOLUNTEER: Kath Dunn at the Ceduna Hospital and Village Auxiliary meeting room, just one of many organisations in which she has volunteered her time since the 1950s. Picture: Luca Cetta

PASSIONATE VOLUNTEER: Kath Dunn at the Ceduna Hospital and Village Auxiliary meeting room, just one of many organisations in which she has volunteered her time since the 1950s. Picture: Luca Cetta

Ingrained with the message her mother taught her, Kath Dunn has remained community-focused throughout her adult years.

“My mother was always community minded and when I was living at home she encouraged me to go down the same path,” Mrs Dunn said.

The 79-year-old has been a volunteer for many decades – remembering her first role as being in the early 1950s when living at Charra – and said she would not have it any other way.

“If you stay at home you will rot,” she said.

“I like to be among people, I like to get to know them, where they come from and what they do, and I like to be among the community.”

That community spirit has only increased since Mrs Dunn moved to Ceduna in 1993.

She is involved in a number of different organisations in the town, including the Ceduna Hospital and Village Auxiliary, Country Women’s Association, Uniting Church Op Shop, Flare on Eyre, Friends of the Women’s and Children’s Hospital Ceduna branch, Meals on Wheels, Probus Club and is a Pink Lady hospital volunteer.

Mrs Dunn said she could not pinpoint how much time she would spend volunteering per week – “it can vary depending on my schedule” – and she could not imagine stopping any time soon.

I like to be among people, I like to get to know them – where they come from and what they do – and I like to be among the community.

Veteran volunteer Kath Dunn

“I am still enjoying what I do, I love doing what I do with the various groups,” she said.

“I always say that where you are able and willing, keep going.

“When I was an Oysterfest ambassador in 2013 it made me appreciate what volunteers do in the community.

“It made me a stronger person and the love and care I received when I was ambassador was unbelievable and showed me I could still be a volunteer.”

As a long-time volunteer, Mrs Dunn encouraged others to take up a position in their community and said it was a fulfilling role.

“If you haven’t done it before, then have a go at it,” she said.

“There is fun in it, you meet lots of people and make new friends.

“For me, I love helping people and that feeling of community, so it is fulfilling to be a volunteer.”

This story Mother’s message lives on first appeared on West Coast Sentinel.